Kies die onderwerp waarin u belangstel of andersins, Alle Publikasies. Sommige van die oorspronlike publikasie wat uit-druk is, is reeds herdruk in ‘n ander formaat. Indien u daarin belangstel gaan na die HERDRUK  BLADSY

  • Indoda Ebisithanda ("The Man Who Loved Us") - The Reverend James Laing among the amaXhosa, 1831-1836
    Volume:
    III-1 (2019)
    This study is a critical edition of a section of the journals of the Reverend James Laing of the Glasgow Missionary Society. The first scholarly study of the Laing journals, this thesis seeks to contribute towards a new understanding of the early days of transcultural interchange on the Eastern Cape frontier. The only previous published work on Laing is William Govan's...
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  • Vol II-50
    In a Time of Plague. Memories of the 'Spanish' Flu Epidemic of 1918 In South Africa
    Volume:
    II-50 (2018)
    The so-called “Spanish” influenza epidemic of 1918 (tellingly dubbed “Black October” by contemporaries in South Africa) was the worst disease episode ever to hit the country. Part of the global pandemic which killed about 3% of the world’s inhabitants in little over a year, in hard-hit South Africa it claimed some 350,000 lives (or 5% of the population) in...
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  • Hendrik Swellengrebel in Afrika: Journalen van Drie Reizen in 1776-1777
    Volume:
    II-49 (2018)
    Hendrik Swellengrebel was born at the Cape on 26 November 1734, the fifth child of Hendrik Swellengrebel Snr, at the time the Secretary of the Council of Policy, but from 1739 Governor of the Cape of Good Hope, and of Helena Wilhelmina ten Damme. After bidding farewell to his parents on 25 March 1746, Hendrik Jr travelled as an...
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  • Seleksies van die Briewe van President M. T. Steyn, 1904-1910
    Volume:
    II-48 (2017)
    President M.T. Steyn is one of the heroes Afrikaner history, leading the guerrilla war against the British from 1899-1902, and fiercely resisting submission. He was struck down by a neural disease in 1902 and was unable to participate in the negotiations that ended the war. In 1902 he went to Europe for treatment and, after a partial recovery, he...
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  • Van Cattle-herding to Editor’s Chair: The Unfinished Autobiography of Richard Victor Selope Thema
    Volume:
    II-47 (2016)
    Richard Victor Selope Thema (1886 - 1955) was one of the most influential black figures in South Africa in the twentieth century - yet little has been published about him until now. 'RV' - as he was known to his friends - was a leading member of the ANC for almost forty years from 1912, serving for many years...
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  • 'An Entirely Different World': Russian Visitors to the Cape 1797-1870
    Volume:
    II-46 (2015)
    The Russian view of the Cape as represented in this volume may be unique. During the period in question, Russia had no cultural, political or economic ties with South Africa. Russians saw the Cape only as a convenient stopover en route to the Far East, to their country’s distant domains that could not be reached by sea otherwise. The Cape...
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  • The World's Great Question. Olive Schreiner's South African Letters 1889-1920
    Volume:
    II-45 (2014)
    The World’s Great Question features over 300 of Olive Schreiner’s key letters on South African people, politics and its racial order. They are often prophetic and can still send shivers down the spine. Immensely readable and insightful, her South African letters ---- bring home Schreiner’s importance as one of the world’s most famous women and a foundational figure...
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  • Into the hitherto Unknown. Ensign Beutler's Expedition to the Eastern Cape, 1752
    Volume:
    II-44 (2013)
    By 1752, the Dutch colony at the Cape extended no further than Mossel Bay. The lands beyond were officially unknown, entered only by illegal hunting and trading parties which had every reason to keep their activities secret. The Beutler expedition, conceived and equipped on a grand scale by Governor Rijk Tulbagh, was tasked to spare neither time nor trouble...
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  • A B Xuma. Autobiography and Selected Works
    Volume:
    II-43 (2012)
    Alfred Bitini Xuma (1893-1962) is best known as the president who revived the African National Congress (ANC) in the 1940s and was then defeated for office by the Congress Youth League. Less known is his important public career as a medical doctor and social reformer, or the continuity of his thought over three decades of writings and speeches, in...
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  • The South African Letters of Thomas Pringle
    Volume:
    II-42 (2011)
    Thomas Pringle, toegeskryf aan James Struthers Stewart Thomas Pringle (1789–1834) word in hierdie land onthou as die ‘vader van die Engelse poësie’, as leier van die enigste Skotse Setlaarsparty in 1820, en as ‘n kampvergter vir die vryheid van die pers. Hy het ‘n vroeëre loopbaan gehad as stigtersredakteur van die Blackwood’s Magazine in Edinburgh en ‘n later een as...
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  • Friendship and Union. The South African Letters of Patrick Duncan and Maud Selborne 1907–1943
    Volume:
    II-41 (2010)
    This volume, published a century after Union in 1910, tells the story of the first decades of the new state. The narrative unfolds through letters exchanged weekly by two interested commentators: Scottish-born Patrick Duncan, who was initially a member of Milner’s famous ‘Kindergarten’ of young British civil servants, and who became a respected politician in the new Union. His...
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  • Alan Paton Selected Letters
    Volume:
    II-40 (2009)
    Alan Paton was a dedicated letter-writer whose letters are almost like a series of vigorous conversations, displaying his capacity for friendship, his lively personality and his principled commitment to South African society. This collection of 350 previously unpublished letters are a major aspect of his writings. They range from those written as a brilliant student of 18 to his...
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  • Isaac Williams Wauchope: Selected Writings 1874-1916
    Volume:
    II-39 (2008)
    Isaac Williams Wauchope (1852-1917) was a prominent member of the Eastern Cape African elite in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a Congregational minister, political activist, historian, poet and, ultimately, legendary hero in the Mendi disaster. As a Lovedale student he joined a missionary party to Malawi, he was instrumental in founding one of the first political organisations...
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  • Francois le Vaillant: Travels into the interior of Africa via the Cape of Good Hope. Vol I
    Volume:
    II-38 (2007)
    In 1780 the young Francois Vaillant (as he then was) set out from Holland for the Cape to collect specimens of birds and animals. His account of his travels, which was published widely during the revolutionary period in France and became an influential piece of writing about South Africa, popular throughout Europe, reflected many Enlightenment attitudes. Le Vaillant’s account...
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  • Words of Batswana: Letters to Mahoko a Becwana, 1883-1896
    Volume:
    II-37 (2006)
    Words of Batswanapresents a selection of letters that were written by Batswana to Mahoko a Becwana (News/Words of Batswana), a Setswana-language newspaper published by missionaries of the London Missionary Society at Kuruman between 1883 and 1896. The majority of the writers were members of congregations in what are today South Africa’s Northern Cape Province and North West Province, but...
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  • Trials of Slavery. Selected Documents Concerning Slaves from the Criminal Records of the Council of Justice at the Cape of Good Hope, 1705-1794
    Volume:
    II-36 (2005)
    Trials of Slavery is a first in South African historiography, a collection of 87 verbatim records of trials involving slaves at the Cape during the 18th century. The cases are drawn from the exceptionally rich archives of the Council of Justice at the Cape of Good Hope under the rule of the Dutch East India Company (VOC), and illuminate...
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  • Moravians in the Eastern Cape 128-1928
    Volume:
    II-35 (2004)
    The four missionary texts which make up this volume reveal the little-known range of Moravian missionary work in the Eastern Cape, from its inception in 1828 to 1928. Vivid and subjective in character, they illuminate this field of Moravian mission activity in South Africa, which extended to the Xhosa the pioneering work done at Genadendal and its family of...
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  • Hendrik Cloete, Groot Constantia en die VOC, 1788-1799
    Volume:
    II-34 (2003)
    Hendrik Cloete, the owner of Groot Constantia from 1778, extended the manor house and improved and marketed the celebrated Constantia wines. This volume, the correspondence between Cloete and Hendrik Swellengrebel jr follows his attempt o obtain the concession from the Dutch East India Company to freely trade and market his famous wines. This material enables the reader to take...
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  • Sir Graham Bower's Secret History of the Jameson Raid and the South African Crisis, 1895-1902
    Volume:
    II-33 (2002)
    Graham Bower's 'Secret History' is a personal insider's account of the great imperial scandal of the Jameson Raid. Bower adhered to a rigid Victorian code of honour. Although he was the official secretary to the British high commission in South Africa, he chose to keep silent and play the role of scapegoat rather than 'blow the whistle' to the...
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  • The war diary of Burgher Jack Lane 16 November 1899 to 27 February 1900
    Volume:
    II-32 (2001)
    John (Jack) Moody Lane, born an Ulsterman, sought his fortune in the South African Republic where he became a storekeeper in the hamlet of Hartbeesfontein in the Western Transvaal. Although he accepted Republican citizenship, he remained loyal to the British cause, and was reluctant to bear arms against his mother country when he was called up to join a...
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  • A Canadian mounted rifleman at war, 189-1902. The reminiscences of A.E. Hilder
    Volume:
    II-31 (2000)
    Albert Edward Hilder was determined to join the British and Allied forces in the Anglo-Boer War. After immigrating to Canada, he joined the Militia of the Royal Canadian Dragoons and volunteered for service when war was declared in October 1899, serving two tours of duty in South Africa in 1900 and 1902. Hilder's writings are rare accounts of the...
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  • The Cape Diaries of Lady Anne Barnard 1799-1800; Vol. II
    Volume:
    II-30 (1999)
    This second volume of the Cape diaries, dealing with 1800, further develop this rich and entertaining account of life at the Cape in the early years of British rule. Politically the Diaries lay bare the dynamics of the conflicts among senior office-holders, not only in the civil administration, but also in and between the army and navy. Lady...
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  • The Cape Diaries of Lady Anne Barnard 1799-1800; Vol. I
    Volume:
    II-29 (1998)
    The Cape Diaries are the private and unrevised records on which Lady Anne based her Journals. Consequently they express Lady Anne's uncensored views on a wide variety of topics, social and political. The diaries are not only illuminating but also vastly entertaining because of her brilliant command of language and the pleasure she took in the act of writing...
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  • The Journal of Gustav de Vylder, naturalist in South-Western Africa 1873-1875
    Volume:
    II-28 (1997)
    Gustav de Vylder, a Swedish naturalist, journeyed through Namibia from 1873 to 1875, collecting insects and other natural-history specimens for institutions in his home country. His travels were undertaken some years before the German colonial occupation when the European presence was slight. De Vylder's journal is a record of an adventurous journey, personal encounters and conditions in what was...
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  • Norwegian missionaries in Natal and Zululand: selected correspondence (1844-1900)
    Volume:
    II-27 (1996)
    The Norwegian Missionary Society established its first permanent stations north of the Tugela in the 1840s. The Zulu Lutheran Church which developed from conversions in the 1860s only really developed after the conquest of Zululand in 1879. The Norwegian missionaries were strategically located to view changes in Zulu culture and civilisation and their letters and reports comprise a rich...
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  • The war memoirs of Commandant Ludwig Krause 1899-1900
    Volume:
    II-26 (1995)
    In 1899 Ludwig Krause left his legal practice in the Transvaal to fight on behalf of the Boers. At first an ordinary burgher, later he became an officer, waging war in the Northern Transvaal. Educated partly at Cambridge, Krause's memoirs are remarkable for their clarity and descriptive power. Their value is enhanced by his outspoken and sometimes pungent opinions,...
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  • Griqua Records, the Philippolis Captaincy, 1825-1861
    Volume:
    II-25 (1994)
    In the Transorange in the early part of the 19th century, there were four small, semi-independent Griqua polities, each ruled by its own Chief or Kaptyn. They of were of considerable importance to the British authorities at the Cape, and to the London Missionary Society. This volume comprises of a collection of official and semi-official documents relating he...
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  • The Cape Journals of Lady Anne Barnard 1797-1798
    Volume:
    II-24 (1993)
    Lady Anne's journals were revised from her original diaries and produced for the interest of her immediate family and friends. They were never intended for publication. However, they are invaluable in the light which they cast on 'the interesting domestic particulars of life in Cape Town', dealing with matters which male writers ignored. In addition, her place in society,...
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  • Johan August Wahlberg: Travel Journals and from letters, South Africa, Namibia and Botswana, 1838-1856
    Volume:
    II-23 (1992)
    Johan August Wahlberg (1810-1856), a Swedish naturalist, travelled through much of southern Africa, including Natal and Namibia, before the mid-19th century. He had been chosen by the Swedish Academy of Sciences to collect plants and animals in southern Africa for the Natural History Museum in Stockholm. His account of his travels is often terse and businesslike but his accounts...
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  • Guillaume Chenu de Chalezac, the 'French Boy'
    Volume:
    II-22 (1991)
    The 15-year-old 'French boy' was wrecked on he Ciskei coast in 1687, and spent a year living in the household of a Xhosa chief. The worlds of the Huguenot diaspora, the great days of Indian Ocean trading, the Cape's pivotal position in the struggle for mastery, and the awakening interest of the Dutch in the 'Terra de Natal' form...
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  • The Commissions of W.C. Palgrave Special Emissary to South West Africa, 1876-1885
    Volume:
    II-21 (1990)
    William Coates Palgrave (1833-1897) was active in South West Africa (Namibia) over a period of 25 years. As Special Commissioner to Hereroland and Namaland, he undertook 5 consecutive commissions to that country on behalf of the Cape government. This volume, containing the official journals, or minutes and reports produced during the commissions, records the life of a country on...
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  • The Last Voyage of the Guardian, Lieutenant Riou Commander, 1789-1791
    Volume:
    II-20 (1989)
    The voyage of HMS Guardian is unique in naval history. She sailed from Spithead in September 1789 with stores for Britain's new colony in New South Wales. Thirteen days out from the Cape of Good Hope she struck an iceberg that tore away her rudder and most of her keel. Half the ship's company took to the boats, only...
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  • The Frontier War Journal of Major John Crealock
    Volume:
    II-19 (1988)
    Major John North Crealock (1837-1895) fought in a number of colonial wars, including the Indian Mutiny and the Anglo-Zulu War. This volume is a detailed account of the warfare conducted against the Xhosa in the last phases of the frontier war of 1877-1878. Opinionated and inefficient, Crealock nevertheless gives a sober account of the military situation.
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  • Breaker Morant and the Bushveldt Carbineers
    Volume:
    II-18 (1987)
    Drawing on a wide selection of sources, this volume seeks to investigate the controversies surrounding the execution of 'Breaker' Morant and his two Australian compatriots. It explores not only the murders associated with Morant, but looks at the context in which the Bushveldt Carbineers were recruited and operated. It remains one of the most scholarly works on the subject.
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  • Carl Peter Thunberg. Travels at the Cape of Good Hope 1772-1775
    Volume:
    II-17 (1986)
    Carl Peter Thunberg (1743), a Swede and disciple of the renowned botanist, Linnaeus the elder, was the first university graduate to travel extensively in the Cape interior, preceding the expedition of his compatriot, Anders Sparrman. Apart from recounting his three journeys - two to the Eastern Cape as far as the Sundays River, and one to the Roggeveld -...
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  • Johannesburg Pioneer Journals 1888-1909
    Volume:
    II-16 (1985)
    Produced to commemorate Johannesburg's centenary, this volume explores the social history of the mining town in its pioneer days. The four journals included are C. Du-Val, 'All the World Around!!! with pencil, pen and camera'; T.R. Adlam, 'Sunrise and Advancing Morn: Memories of a South African Boyhood'; E. Bright, 'Letters, 1902-1909; Excerpts from the memoirs of William T. Powell.
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  • The Garrett Papers
    Volume:
    II-15 (1984)
    Edmund Garrett (1865-1907) was a member of the family which produced such leading feminists as Dr Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and Millicent Garrett Fawcett. In 1895 he was appointed editor of the Cape Times and remained there during the crucial period of the Jameson Raid and the lead-up to the South African War. A staunch imperialist he formed close relationships...
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  • The Letters of Jane Elizabeth Waterston 1866-1905
    Volume:
    II-14 (1983)
    Jane Waterston (1843-1932) accompanied the missionary, Dr James Stewart, to the Eastern Cape when he became principal of the Lovedale Institution. There she started the Girls' Institution but her real desire was to work as a doctor amongst women in the interior of Africa. In 1874 she returned to England where she was amongst the first women to train...
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  • Briefwisseling van Hendrik Swellengrebel Jr. oor Kaapse Sake 1779-1792
    Volume:
    II-13 (1982)
    Hendrik Swellengrebel Jr (1734-1803) was the son of Hendrik Swellengrebel who served as governor for a number of years and retained extensive properties there. The younger Swellengrebel lived a comfortable life in the Netherlands, but visited the Cape between 1776-1777. Thereafter he retained an interest in Cape affairs. He became associated with the rebel Cape Patriot movement and did...
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  • Selections from the correspondence of Percy Alport Molteno 1892-1914
    Volume:
    II-12 (1981)
    Percy Molteno (1861-1937) was a son of Sir John Molteno, first prime minister of the Cape Colony. Trained as a lawyer, he married the daughter of Sir Donald Currie, the shipping magnate, and went to work for his father-in-law in England. He remained passionately interested in the political life of the colony and conducted a wide-ranging correspondence with many...
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  • Edward Ross: Diary of the siege of Mafeking, October 1899 to May 1900
    Volume:
    II-11 (1980)
    Edward Ross, Mafeking's auctioneer, is best-known for his role in the production of banknotes during the siege. His diary is amongst the finest of the many accounts of the siege, recording the activities of Mafeking's residents as well as the military aspects of the siege.
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  • William Somerville's narrative of his journeys to the Eastern Cape frontier and to Lattakoe 1799-1802
    Volume:
    II-10 (1979)
    William Somerville, an Edinburgh doctor, accompanied the invading forces of Major-General Craig when the British took the Cape in 1795. He remained at the Cape for some years, accompanying Major-General Dundas to the eastern districts during the height of conflict on the frontier. Subsequently he accompanied an expedition to the Orange River. On both occasions he recorded the...
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  • Selected Articles from the Cape Monthly Magazine (New Series 1870-76)
    Volume:
    II-9 (1978)
    The Cape Monthly Magazine was the best-known of the 19th century Cape journals. Edited by Professor Roderick Noble of the South African College, and Alfred Whaley Cole, it attracted contributions from leading Cape intellectuals. This selection deals with travels and historical reminiscences and includes articles by Dr W.G. Atherstone, Charles Brownlee and Robert Godlonton
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  • Lawrence Richardson. Selected correspondence (1902-1903)
    Volume:
    II-8 (1977)
    Lawrence Richardson (c.1869-1953), a member of the Society of Friends (Quakers), was involved in two fact-finding and humanitarian missions to South Africa in the wake of the South African War. His meticulous diaries detail his interviews and draw a perceptive picture of a society devastated by war.
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  • Anders Sparrman. Travels in the Cape 1772-1776: Vol. II
    Volume:
    II-7 (1976)
    This second volume of Sparrman's travels concerns his account of his journey to the Eastern Cape including a stay at Agter Bruintjies Hoogte. It includes comments on the practices of the Khoi of the eastern districts and of local flora and fauna.
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  • Anders Sparrman. Travels in the Cape 1772-1776; Vol. I
    Volume:
    II-6 (1975)
    Anders Sparrman (1748-1820), a young Swedish doctor, is noteworthy for his visit to parts of the Cape which were little known at that time. This first volume describes his journey past Mossel Bay and through the Langkloof.
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  • David Livingstone South African Papers (1849-1853)
    Volume:
    II-5 (1974)
    This volume of Livingstone's writings, which predates his travels, is concerned primarily with South African racial and missionary affairs as well as comments on traders. His bitter prejudice against the Boers emerges clearly, as do his conflicts with other missionaries., but his insights into local societies are nonetheless revealing.
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  • Beschryvinge van Kaap der Goede Hoope, met de zaaken daar toe behoorende, door François Valentyn, 1726. Vol II.
    Volume:
    II-4 (1973)
    This second part of Valentyn's travels continues with the account of his visit in 1702 and a later visit of 1714. It includes a lengthy account of the customs of the Khoi and their language, the fauna to be encountered and the early history of the settlement.
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  • Sir James Rose Innes: Selected Correspondence (1884-1902)
    Volume:
    II-3 (1972)
    Sir James Rose Innes (1855-1942) was one of South Africa's leading jurists. This volume deals with Rose Innes's political career, initially as a member of Cecil John Rhodes's first ministry in 1890-1893. The political divisions caused by the Jameson Raid forced Rose Innes reluctantly into the loyalist camp. In 1900 he returned to cabinet as attorney-general for the Cape...
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  • Beschryvinge van Kaap der Goede Hoope, met de zaaken daar toe behoorende, door François Valentyn, 1726. Vol I.
    Volume:
    II-2 (1971)
    François Valentyn (1666-1727) was sent out to the Dutch East Indies as a young man to work as a minister of religion. His interests extended to the natural world which he encountered in the Moluccas and the Cape. Valentyn visited the Cape several times over a period of almost 30 years and observed the changes occurring in the fledgling...
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  • Dagboek van Adam Tas, 1705-1706
    Volume:
    II-1 (1970)
    Adam Tas (1668-1722) was an early Dutch free burgher, farming in the Stellenbosch district. He is best known for the part he played in the free burgher conflicts with the Governor Willem Adriaan van der Stel, concerning the corruption of Company officials and their misuse of trading monopolies. This diary, the work of an engaging and genial man, describes...
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  • Selections from the Correspondence of J.X. Merriman, 1905-1924
    Volume:
    I-50 (1969)
    The final volume of Merriman's correspondence deals with the making of Union, including his views on constitution-making, and his period as prime minister of the Cape Colony. Merriman remained in parliament after Union, participating in events leading up to, and just after World War I.
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  • Travels and Adventures in Southern Africa by George Thompson, 1823-24; Vol. II
    Volume:
    I-49 (1968)
    This second volume of Thompson's travels covers a journey to the 'country of the bushmen, Korannas, and Namaquas', in the Roggeveld and Namaqualand. The volume concludes with 'observations on the present condition of the Dutch and English inhabitants' and a discussion on the commercial potential of the Cape Colony.
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  • Travels and Adventures in South Africa by George Thompson, 1823-24; Vol. I
    Volume:
    I-48 (1967)
    George Thompson, who arrived in the Cape about 1818, was a successful merchant in Cape Town. He married a Dutch woman and travelled widely in southern Africa in the early years of the 19th century. Much of this travelling was to expand the business of his company amongst the 1820 settlers of the Eastern Cape. He also travelled up...
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  • Selections from the Correspondence of J.X. Merriman, 1899-1904
    Volume:
    I-47 (1966)
    Vol. III covers the period of the South African War, including Merriman's participation in the pro-Boer Schreiner ministry, and a period in opposition. During this time he fought against the suspension of the Cape constitution and for a fair deal for Cape rebels. It concludes with his participation in the South African Native Affairs Commission and the election which...
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  • Reize in de Binnen-Landen van Zuid-Africa. Gedaan in den Jaare 1803 door W.B.E. Paravicini di Capelli, Kapitein Aide de Camp, by den Gouverneur van de Caap de Goede Hoop
    Volume:
    I-46 (1965)
    Paravicini di Capelli was an artillery-captain at the time of the Batavian Republic and aide-de-camp of the Cape governor, General Jan Willem Janssens. He travelled with the governor into the interior, keeping an official journal as well as his own, and was active in preparations of the Cape against attack by the British, travelling widely during this period. In...
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  • Journal of Residence in Africa, 1842-1853, by Thomas Baines; Vol. II
    Volume:
    I-45 (1964)
    Vol. II covers the Vaal River Expedition of 1850, in which Baines travelled through the Orange Free State and up to Potchefstroom. It concludes with the 8th Frontier War from 1850 to 1851.
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  • Selections from the Correspondence of J.X. Merriman, 1890-1898
    Volume:
    I-44 (1963)
    Vol.II covers the first Rhodes' ministry, of which Merriman was Colonial Treasurer, his break with Rhodes and the period leading up to the South African war, including the Jameson Raid. It was in this latter period that Merriman formed his alliance with the Afrikaner Bond and adopted his pro-Boer stance.
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  • The Reminiscences of Sir Walter Stanford; Vol. II
    Volume:
    I-43 (1962)
    Stanford's second volume of reminiscences records his life in Pondoland as chief magistrate, up to its annexation, the impact of the South African War, the creation of Ndabeni, Cape Town's first location and the Native Affairs Commission of 1904.
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  • Journal of Residence in Africa, 1842-1853, by Thomas Baines; Vol. I
    Volume:
    I-42 (1961)
    Thomas Baines was one of South Africa's most notable artists, recording many historical events, which he meticulously recorded both with brush and with pen. This volume covers many of his journeys in the eastern Cape, with the Liddle expedition and on his own.
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  • Selections from the Correspondence of J.X. Merriman, 1870-1890
    Volume:
    I-41 (1960)
    John X. Merriman, son of Archdeacon Merriman, was one of the most brilliant politicians at the Cape. His long political career spanned most of the major political events of the late-19th and early 20th-century, culminating in the prime minister's office just before Union in 1910. Politically Merriman was a liberal, working closely with Rhodes when the latter first became...
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  • The Journal of Joseph Tindall, missionary in South-West Africa, 1839-55
    Volume:
    I-40 (1959)
    Joseph Tindall, a Wesleyan missionary, worked in South-West Africa, initially with Jonker Afrikaner in Damaraland. His journal includes much information about local customs and conflicts between Damara groups. This work lacks the usual historical introduction.
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  • The Reminiscences of Sir Walter Stanford; Vol. I
    Volume:
    I-39 (1958)
    Sir Walter Stanford served for many years in the Native Affairs Department of the Cape Colony, retiring in 1907, when he began to write his memoirs. This first volume describes his youth, education at Lovedale College and his work in the Native Affairs Department during the 1870s, concluding with the Cape Native Laws and Customs Commission in 1881-3.
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  • Maleo en Sekoekoeni
    Volume:
    I-38 (1957)
    Dr Theodor Wangemann was a director of the Berlin Missionary Society who came out to South Africa in 1866 to visit the mission stations throughout the country. This work, one of several which Wangemann wrote and a typical example of nineteenth-century German missionary literature, describes mission work in the Lydenburg district of the northern Transvaal.
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  • The Cape Journals of Archdeacon N.J. Merriman, 1848-55
    Volume:
    I-37 (1957 for 1956)
    Archdeacon Merriman was appointed Archdeacon of Grahamstown by Bishop Robert Gray in 1848. his instructions were to expand the church in the Eastern Cape by establishing new congregations and building churches in the small townships. He was to 'awaken 'religious instincts long dormant through lack of opportunity' and to 'preach to barbarous people the saving grace of Christianity.' In...
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  • Andrew Smith and Natal; documents relating to the early history of the Province
    Volume:
    I-36 (1955)
    Andrew Smith, a British doctor, journeyed to Natal in 1832, ostensibly for scientific purposes, but almost certainly operating under instructions. The text includes an account of his visit to Dingane and notes on the different tribal groups which he encountered, the Cape Town Merchants' Memorial of 1835 and some of the records of the South African Land and Emigration...
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  • The Narrative and Journal of Gerald McKiernan in South-West Africa during the years 1847-70
    Volume:
    I-35 (1954)
    Gerald McKiernan was an American trader, operating in South West Africa in the last decade before German colonial rule. The manuscript consists of a narrative of 5 years' travel in Africa, from 1875 to 1879, and a diary which he kept from 1877 to 1879. The author travelled widely, probably reaching well into Angola.
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  • A Source Book on the Wreck of the Grosvenor East Indiaman
    Volume:
    I-34 (1953)
    This volume is a companion to The Wreck of the Grosvenor, published by the VRS in 1927. It includes various accounts of the wreck, the journal of William Hubberly, a survivor of the wreck, as well as some Dutch material on the event. The volume concludes with a full list of the ship's company and passengers.
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  • Die Dagboek van H.A.L. Hamelberg [in die Kaap en Oranje-Vrystaat], 1855-71
    Volume:
    I-33 (1952)
    H.A.L. Hamelberg was a Hollander who visited the Cape in 1855, remaining there for six months. Subsequently he undertook a journey from Cape Town to Bloemfontein where he spent about seven years. The journal covers the earlier events in more detail
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  • Die Konvensie-dagboek van Sy Edelagbare François Stephanus Malan
    Volume:
    I-32 (1951)
    F.S. Malan, at one time editor of Ons Land, was a Cape delegate to the National Convention in Durban, which negotiated the terms of the Union of South Africa. Malan himself noted that the journal had a dual purpose: '1 To give a short summary of the proceedings of the Conference and 2. To put on record what my...
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  • Letters of the American Missionaries, 1835-1838
    Volume:
    I-31 (1951 for 1950)
    The American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions was one of the last missionary societies to begin work in South Africa. Since the Cape Colony was well-populated with missionaries, the Americans concentrated initially on the Matabele in the Transvaal, and on Natal. Their arrival coincided with the Great Trek and Boer expansion north and east so they were well...
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  • The Chronicle of Jeremiah Goldswain, Albany Settler of 1820; Vol. II
    Volume:
    I-29 (1949 for 1948)
    In the second volume of his journal, Goldswain described the increasing tension between black and white on the frontier, his experiences as a trader, and his relations with his own family, including their medical treatment. His journal is most attractive for its naïve frankness.
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  • Journals of Andrew Geddes Bain, trader, explorer, soldier, road engineer and geologist
    Volume:
    I-30 (1949)
    Andrew Geddes Bain is best known for his building of Cape roads and passes. His diaries, from 1826 to the 1840s, were both working journals and accounts of his experiences and descriptions of the people he encountered in the course of his work. This volume includes his chronicle of his journey in 1826 to the northern Cape.
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  • The Chronicle of Jeremiah Goldswain, Albany Settler of 1820; Vol. II
    Volume:
    I-29 (1949 for 1948)
    In the second volume of his journal, Goldswain described the increasing tension between black and white on the frontier, his experiences as a trader, and his relations with his own family, including their medical treatment. His journal is most attractive for its naïve frankness.
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  • The Journal of Carel Frederik Brink of the journey into Great Namaqualand [1761-2] made by Captain Hendrik Hop and The Journal of the journey of Ensign Johannes Tobias Rhenius [1724]
    Volume:
    I-28 (1947)
    Hendrik Hop was a Stellenbosch farmer who led a pioneering journey into Namaqualand. The account of the journey is told by the Cape surveyor and map-maker, Carel Brink. Accompanying this record is the brief journal of the trading journey of Johannes Rhenius of Berlin, made nearly 40 years before that of Hop. His account is of particular interest because...
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  • The Chronicle of Jeremiah Goldswain, Albany Settler of 1820; Vol. I
    Volume:
    I-27 (1946)
    Jeremiah Goldswain's journals, written phonetically in his mid-English dialect, have been a source of interest to linguists as well as historians. A sawyer from Buckinghamshire, Goldswain migrated to the Eastern Cape in 1820. The first part of his journal describes the early difficulties of the settlers on the frontier.
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  • The Chronicle of Jeremiah Goldswain, Albany Settler of 1820; Vol. I
    Volume:
    I-27 (1946)
    Jeremiah Goldswain's journals, written phonetically in his mid-English dialect, have been a source of interest to linguists as well as historians. A sawyer from Buckinghamshire, Goldswain migrated to the Eastern Cape in 1820. The first part of his journal describes the early difficulties of the settlers on the frontier.
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  • South African Journal of John Sheddon Dobie, 1862-6
    Volume:
    I-26 (1945)
    After emigrating to Australia twice, where he had acquired experience in sheep farming, in 1862 Dobie emigrated to Natal, intending to bring sheep farming to Natal. He had little success and left Natal in 1866 for South America. The diary describes his attempts at pastoral farming and his experiences in Natal.
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  • Mentzel, O.F. - A geographical-topographical description of the Cape of Good Hope. Part III
    Volume:
    I-25 (1944)
    In this third volume of Mentzel's account of life at the Cape he travelled into the interior, to Stellenbosch and Swellendam. He comments on agriculture and viticulture, as well as hunting. The final chapters discuss the Khoi inhabitants.
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  • M.D. Teenstra - De vruchten mijner werkzaamheden, gedurende mijne reize over de Kaap de Goede Hoop, naar Java en terug, over St Helena, naar de Nederlanden, 1830
    Volume:
    I-24 (1943)
    M.D. Teenstra was 'n Nederlandse hereboer wat die Kaap in 1825 besoek het. Tydens sy verblyf het hy vir 'n kuur na die Caledon-baddens gegaan en ook Genadendal en Kaap Agulhas besoek; hy het via Franschhoek en Stellenbosch na die Kaap teruggekeer. Sy waarnemings is skerp en volledig en hy het goed gebruik gemaak van die statistieke en ander...
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  • Willem Stephanus van Ryneveld se Aanmerkingen over de verbetering van het vee aan de Kaap de Goede Hoop, 1804
    Volume:
    I-23 (1942)
    This volume touches on one of the most important aspects of South African economic history before the discovery of diamonds and gold. It is an early study of the livestock industry at the Cape, especially the development of the merino sheep industry. The author was a colonial-born Company official, who found favour with the British authorities when they took...
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  • The Narrative of Private Buck Adams, 7th (Princess Royal's) Dragoon Guards on the Eastern Frontier of the Cape of Good Hope, 1843-1848
    Volume:
    I-22 (1941)
    An unusual account of military life on the Eastern Frontier from the perspective of a common soldier. Adams wrote his account in 1884, forty years after his service in South Africa. The editor observes that 'His improbable tales have proved substantially true on investigation'. He served in the War of the Axe and the action at Zwart Koppies in...
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  • The Diary of Dr Andrew Smith, director of the 'Expedition for exploring Central Africa', 1834-6; Vol. II
    Volume:
    I-21 (1940)
    The second volume of Smith's diary picks up the expedition with descriptions of Baralong social life. The party travelled through the northern Cape to Mafeking and onto Mosega. Subsequently they trekked east and then returned to Cape Town, via Mzilikazi whom they visited for the second time. The diary includes extended accounts of wild life as well as the...
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  • The Diary of Dr Andrew Smith, director of the 'Expedition for exploring Central Africa', 1834-6; Vol. I
    Volume:
    I-20 (1939)
    Andrew Smith, an army doctor, arrived in the Cape in 1820, remaining there until 1837. The expedition to Central South Africa was undertaken to find out more about the people living to the north. Smith travelled up to Kuruman and into Ndabele country, and explored the Oori, Mariqua and Limpopo Rivers. The expedition included a number of missionaries, among...
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  • Die Duminy Dagboeke [with English translation]
    Volume:
    I-19 (1938)
    The Duminy diaries consist of the diary of Johanna Margareta Duminy (1797), the journal of François Duminy of his visit to the Caledon Baths and the Bok river (9 November 1810 to 4 March 1811), the journal François Duminy's expedition to Walfish Bay in 1893 and Sebastian Valentyn van Reenen's journal of the same expedition. An English translation of...
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  • Die Joernaal van Dirk Gysbert van Reenen, 1803
    Volume:
    I-18 (1937)
    This is an account of a journey in to the Eastern Cape undertaken by the Governor of the Cape, J.W. Janssens and Capt Paravicini de Capelli, recorded by D.G. van Reenen. Van Reenen was a prominent burger at the Cape, a winemaker, reputed to make the best wine in the Cape, and he held the wine and meat...
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  • Travels and Adventures in Eastern Africa by Nathaniel Isaacs; Vol. II
    Volume:
    I-17 (1936)
    Isaac’s journal is one of the first reports of a European on Natal and the kingdom of the Zulus. The first volume begins in 1825 when Isaacs went to Natal for the first time. The major portion of the text consists of a detailed description of Shaka, his society and culture. In 1830 Isaacs returned to Natal when Dingaan...
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  • Travels and Adventures in Eastern Africa by Nathaniel Isaacs; Vol. I
    Volume:
    I-16 (1935)
    Isaacs' journal is one of the earliest European accounts of Natal and the Zulu kingdom. The first volume opens in 1825 when Isaacs first went to Natal. Most of the volume is devoted to an extended description of Shaka and his society and culture.
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  • The Journal of Hendrik Jacob Wikar [1779] with an English translation by A.W. van der Horst; and the Journals of Jacobus Coetse Jansz [1760] and Willem van Reenen [1791]
    Volume:
    I-15 (1935)
    These journals were published originally in Molsbergen's Reizen in Zuid Afrika. Wikar's report is an account of the daily life and adventures of the first European who is known to have journeyed along the Orange River, while that of Jansz records the first European crossing of the Orange River into South-West Africa . Van Reenen crossed the Orange River...
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  • The early Cape Hottentots described in the writings of Olfert Dapper [1668], Willem Ten Rhyne [1686] and Johannes Gulielmus de Grevenbroek [1695]
    Volume:
    I-14 (1933)
    Most early travellers to the Cape included some account of the local Khoisan societies. The three works published here are more comprehensive than most, giving a reasonable idea of the state of knowledge about indigenous peoples in the Western Cape by the end of the 17th century. These are the accounts of travellers rather than scientists but the more...
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  • Louis Trigardt's Trek across the Drakensberg, 1837-1838
    Volume:
    I-13 (1932)
    This volume reconstructs Trigardt's journey into Natal, using his diary as the basis for this journey. It also records his comments about the people he encountered en route.
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  • Journals of the expedition of the Honourable Ensign Olof Bergh [1682 and 1683] and Isaq Schrijver [1689]
    Volume:
    I-12 (1931)
    The Swede, Olaf Bergh, was one of the earliest travellers to undertake the journey up to Namaqualand. The purpose of his journeys was to negotiate with the 'Sousequase and Gourisse Hottentots' , to trade and to familiarise himself with the region up the Cape west coast. Isaq Schrijver of Leiden was also sent north by Governor Simon van...
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  • Lichtenstein, Henry - Travels in Southern Africa in the years 1803, 1804, 1805, 1806; by Henry Lichtenstein; Vol II
    Volume:
    I-11 (1928-30)
    In this second volume Lichtenstein returned to Cape Town via Graaff Reinet and the Karroo. Subsequently he returned to the Swellendam district. His last journey took him north to Kuruman where he encountered the Koranna and the Bechuana.
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  • Lichtenstein, Henry - Travels in Southern Africa in the years 1803, 1804, 1805, 1806; by Henry Lichtenstein: Vol I
    Volume:
    I-10 (1928-30)
    Lichtenstein was a German doctor who travelled widely through the Cape, commenting on the landscape and economy of the people whom he encountered. His first journey, in the western and northern parts of the colony, took him to Saldanha Bay, the Bokkeveld and into the Great Karroo. From there he visited Swellendam and travelled along the southern coast to...
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  • Die Dagboek van Hendrik Witbooi, Kaptein van die Witbooi-Hottentotte, 1884-1906
    Volume:
    I-9 (1929)
    Hendrik Witbooi, who had been born at Pella, south of the Orange River, was trained as an evangelist. Subsequently he moved north to Gibeon in Namibia where he established himself as a powerful figure, conducting campaigns against the Herero, many of whom were subordinated to him. The diary, which he kept from 1884 to 1894 , is in...
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  • The Wreck of the Grosvenor
    Volume:
    I-8 (1927)
    Containing a narrative of the loss of the Grosvenor, East Indiaman, wrecked on the Coast of Caffraria, 1782; compiled by Mr George Carter, from the examination of John Hynes, one of the survivors, London, 1791; and Journal of a Journey from the Cape of Good Hope in 1790 and 1791, undertaken by J. van Reenen and others in search...
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  • The Diary of the Rev. F. Owen, Missionary with Dingaan, together with the accounts of Zulu affairs by the interpreters, Messrs. Hully and Kirkman
    Volume:
    I-7 (1926)
    Owen produced one of the best-known descriptions of life in Dingaan's kraal, including an account of the Retief massacre, of which he was the only white witness. This was the first time that the diary has been published in its entirety, apart from the Bechuanaland portion 'which had been re-written to include the history but to exclude the theology'.
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  • Mentzel, O.F. - A geographical-topographical description of the Cape of Good Hope. Part II
    Volume:
    I-6 (1924)
    The second part of Mentzel's account of life at the Cape ranges widely, from revenues available to the Cape government, to the daily life of the burghers, public auctions and the treatment of slaves.
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  • Collectanea
    Volume:
    I-5 (1922)
    Includes descriptions of the Cape by Ovington, 1695; Beeckman, 1715; Dampier, 1691; Rogers' Description of Natal, c. 1696; Cnoll's Dagregister van een reis naar het Warme Bad, with an English translation; Dagverhaal wegens de reis naar 't Warme Water, opgesteld door Willem van Putten, c. 1710, with an English translation; letter dated 1708 from John Maxwell to Rev. Dr...
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  • Mentzel, O.F. - A geographical-topographical description of the Cape of Good Hope. Part I
    Volume:
    I-4 (1921)
    The first of three volumes by Mentzel on conditions at the Cape as he found them in the mid-18th century. Mentzel intended to correct the errors perpetrated by such earlier travellers as Kolb. This volume contains an historical background, a description of the physical features of the Cape and accounts of the administration and finances of the colony.
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  • De Mist, J.A. - Memorandum containing recommendations for the form and administration of government at the Cape of Good Hope, 1802
    Volume:
    I-3 (1920)
    As was the case with many of the early volumes of the Society, this is a bilingual text. It is the report of the commission sent to the Cape in the critical years between the two British occupations. The purpose of the report was to decide on the future government of the Cape, but it ranged widely over social,...
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  • Mentzel, O.F. - Life at the Cape in the mid-eighteenth century, being the biography of Rudolph Siegfried Allemann, Captain of the Military Forces at the Cape of Good Hope
    Volume:
    I-2 (1919)
    This 'biography' of Allemann is, in fact, an entertaining account of social life at the Cape during the mid-18th century. The topics range from the structure of the military forces to the life of slaves, and the revolt of Etienne Barbier to shipwrecks and the financial prospects of young women.
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  • Reports of De Chavonnes and his Council, and of Van Imhoff, on the Cape
    Volume:
    I-1 (1918)
    Written in Dutch, with translations in English, according to John X Merriman, one of the founders of the society, these documents deal 'with matters that Dr Theal characterized as, probably, of the greatest importance to the European Settlement in this country'. They are official reports on conditions at the Cape.
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